[ BOOKS ] ✭ The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights Author Anonymous . – Pmgtest.info

The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights A Story to Save a Live The beauty of the stories and the poetry of the thought that most destructive demons can be tamed back with a few stories was fascinating to me even when I first saw the serialized version on tv What I didn t realized was that the stories Scheherazade, that great goddess of story tellers and inventor of cliff hangings, told the king weren t as random but had an order in themselves.This book has made Scherzade my favorite superhero superhero was the word we use for o A Story to Save a Live The beauty of the stories and the poetry of the thought that most destructive demons can be tamed back with a few stories was fascinating to me even when I first saw the serialized version on tv What I didn t realized was that the stories Scheherazade, that great goddess of story tellers and inventor of cliff hangings, told the king weren t as random but had an order in themselves.This book has made Scherzade my favorite superhero superhero was the word we use for one who risk one s life for others, don t we I mean we like Doctor Who for he won t use weapons and yet the enemies he fought weren t in any way real What Scherzade had to fight was real, and after centuries of her single victory continues unfortunately to remain real lack of trust among sexes Sheriyar is misogyny humanized There is another famous collection of stories called Tota Maine ke kise from same regions Iraq, Iran, India etc which comprise of a parrot and she parrot who are in love The frame story is simple The parrot would say mynah is sure to cheat him and would back that prediction with a story where a woman cheated on her lover Mynah, in her turn, would say it is parrot who is sure to cheat her and will back that up with a story of how some man cheated on his lover Then parrot would come back with another story and this exchange of accusations will go on and on A similar conversation takes place between Shylock s daughter and her lover towards the end of Merchant of Venice Sheriyar is the result of this mistrust among sexes In a short time, he comes across three cases of adulatory committed by three women, including one by his own wife, and generalizes to the whole of the fair sex Remember how Hamlet concluded Frailty thy after seeing frailty of a single woman his mother A person who is suffering because he thinks he is cheated can be quite suggestible Othello And a generalization can be temting The parrot and she parrot were afraid of how vulnerable they are making themselves to other s injuries Sheriyar has developed this fear after being cheated his wife His Black Widower s wish, to kill his spouse the morning after marriage, is height of this mistrust.And Sherzade is the beauty who tamed this beast She did this she fought away her death the literal sword of her own father a few hours away from being forced to cut her head with armor of a pleasant smile on her lips and the weapon of story on her tongue And she does that Repeatedly For a thousand and one nights In the play I ll teach the King Not the play but through the stories repetitive Shakespearean references are coincidental A tyrant can t be reasoned with directly Same goes for a prejudiced person prejudice is by very definition refusal to reconsider the already reached false conclusions Now imagine prejudiced tyrants Scherzade knew this well enough Instead, she used her stories to make king see the truth The change of heart, which the king admitted to on the thousand and the first night, wasn t born all of sudden but came out of efforts of last thousand nights over which she gradually changed the opinion of the king.And it is the way she changed king s opinion that I love so much As good as the stories are in themselves, they carry a trend One of the very first story, Scherzade told the king was about a wicked woman, but a woman made wicked by jealousy against his husband s new wife May be the king understood her jealousy, maybe he didn t.Then you come across the story of a king, suffering from misfortune caused by an adulterous wife a king not unlike Scheriyar, may be Scheherazade is simply saying what king would love to hear but look carefully, and you will notice that the villain wife suddenly gets a voice Even though she was beheaded, the wife in the story did get a say love of an adultress woman is love still You see what Scherzade did.Move a little ahead and roles are reversed Now we meet a woman who has to suffer on account of meaningless jealousy of her husband a husband who doesn t want her to show his face in public Her husband is made to repent in the end There is a similar story towards the end, except there it is husband suffering of his wife s jealousy So now you see the trend There is soon a story in which a king Haroon is at fault making people suffer with his tyrannies but he is quick to repent upon realizing the mistake and even makes up for the loss of these people Did you get you lesson, Sheriyar And so it goes on One story actually involved a prince who has formed a bad opinion regarding all women kind from all the mischief caused by them that he read about in his books His mother, the queen asked him to think about all the tyrant kings that the world has and what they have done to the women over centuries I can imagine Scheherazade having her tongue in her cheek when she must have narrated the scene Later on, Scheherazade diverts to stories about how married women have fun at the expense of their wanna be lovers.The last story is that of a woman Ulysses and Penlope combined into one woman, who goes out on a difficult journey while maintaining her loyality to her husband against all the suitors.Gradually, the stories change to afford a better position for women and while also reminding the king that even King can make mistakes and how muchtroublesome are their mistakes than that of an ordinary person There are a few stories e.g Sindbad where the issue of friction between sexes is not raised but the general trend is too good to miss In fact, very first few pages you find a remark by a woman other than Scherzade about futility of keeping women under lock In Aladin s story, it is the princess who kills the bad guy and her name is not Jasmine Sherzade got that wrong, Disney knew better In Ali Baba s story, it is a woman, avery, very clever woman who kills all the forty thieves While we are talking about fighting prejudice a good reason for people to read it to observe how lightly the veil is used by women Women, who wear vile while being out, are shown at liberty and often chose to show their face to whoever they wish to They often do it for the guy, even if he is a stranger, they found handsome who in turn is almost always pierced by their beauty Not only that, there are a lot of night parties and extra marital kissing Yes, there are strict and overprotective fathers but I mean that goes everywhere Then in at least one place, there is a remark on regarding how the judges are too strict regarding how women should behave It is surprising these same judges had nothing to say about drinking wine or when their king hadthan four wives Moreover, there seems to be no way men can cheat their wives men are permitted marry multiple times and can have sex with slaves under Islam like other religions but women are not this means men can not cheat on their wives Celebrating the art of Storytelliing There are a number of techniques used by the Scheherazade cliff hangings, repetitive characters king Haroon and his wife, Zobeida story within story at times story within story within story within story etc One time Scheherazade forgets a part of narrative and have to retreat to cover that part.Cliff hangings though were never that important and never that close to being figurative Here they are saving lives the stakes on which Scherzade bargains to get another day of life Regarding the story within story thing, you may claim that too many of the stories are told by characters trying to save lives But look at Scheherazade, the original story teller Isn t she doing the same Won t her psychology affect her stories And it is the most excellent part that story teller and the listener are both part of the story you get most out of it when you think about how their minds are involved in and are affected by the stories Just imagine the thoughts that Sheriyar would carry in his mind at the end of each story.There is a criticism that some of stories are too similar but you see it is because of the central theme And I mean how much diversity you can wish for There are love stories both comedies and tragedies, stories of adventures, stories of genies, humorous stories especially the one about tailor , criminal stories, stories of suddenly found treasures There is one short story about the three brothers who can reason backwards a little like Sherlock Holmes Given its time, the stories show remarkable diversity.In one weird story, a woman disguised as her own husband marries another woman Latter this second woman marries husband of first Weird enough Wait till the two women find a crush for each other s sons Antisemitism, Racism and Body Shaming From beautiful to ugly There is a lot of muchthan you can imagine antisemitism, racism and body shaming specially in first 200 or so pages, especially for a book trying to fight prejudice All wicked wizards are African, Jew, Worshiper of fire or Hindu All cheating merchants are Jews It probably speaks as much about powerful men s sexual jealousies as about slavery, that a lot of slaves were eunuchs The filthy tradition of eunuchs was not limited to Arabia though Some female slaves do seem to gain independence and are lawfully married but that is a fairy tale sort of thing The terrible treatment of a hunch back in particular made me stop reading it for a month.I don t believe in cultural, temporal or spatial relativism so I won t defend the book I just took away six stars from my rating It was already twenty nine stars Some advice if you chose to live in medieval Persia view spoiler 1 There is nothingrisky than serving lovers cause or kings 2.The most dangerous job is that Vizir better be a slave than a vizir Since king may take you along on a expedition mostly in disguise find random people or dead bodies and want you to discover the truth behind them within three, thirty or forty days failing which your head is likely to be beheaded 3.If a married woman seems to be answering your requests to take you as lover, than she is just kidding and is probably going to get you a lot of trouble.4 If you suddenly found yourself in room of some person of opposite sex, than it is probably doing of some Jinn and Pari Soon you will found yourself in love with other person but will forget to ask where the hell you are Then early morning, you shall be thrown back to your place And after a lot of suffering shall found your lover again.5 If you got separated from your family, don t worry, you shall find them after a few years healthy and happy bringing a family reunion and happily ever after unless Scherzade chose to give your story a sequel.6 Have a story to tell, in case you get in trouble with king or a Jinn.7.If two darveshes wants admittance to your house than it is probably king and his ministers, specially there are multiple sisters in the house Admit him and tell him something strange For, he would then make you rich.8 You are most likely to be married to the king, if you are youngest of three sisters Youngest of brothers are lucky too Also in case of princes, it helps your future prospects greatly if your mother was deserted by king.9 If you are young, poor and handsome man, than you will soon be wealthy it just follows If you are are a beautiful woman, than your veil is liable to flown away by wind in front of some man who will instantly fall in love with you.10 If your husband has something old and useless lying around, don t give it away it is sure to be magical.11 Password for cave is open Sim sim 12 Sea journeys are especially dangerous if you are single or your spouse is lost.And above all,13 If you found an old lamp, to rub it hide spoiler Arabian Nights is one of the great literary works of all time but precautions need to be made if you want to read it to your kids First off, there is a LOT of violence in the stories and a TON of sex Don t be an idiot like me and start reading an unabridged copy to your kids or you will have to be explaining very early on why so and so killed his wife and imprisoned anotherThat being said, there are few works with as much imagination and wonder in them and taken in lighter doses, it is a be Arabian Nights is one of the great literary works of all time but precautions need to be made if you want to read it to your kids First off, there is a LOT of violence in the stories and a TON of sex Don t be an idiot like me and start reading an unabridged copy to your kids or you will have to be explaining very early on why so and so killed his wife and imprisoned anotherThat being said, there are few works with as much imagination and wonder in them and taken in lighter doses, it is a beautiful way of expanding your children s imaginations.For adults, one has to take a lot of this in its historical context and try hard to put aside the misogyny which is rampant in the text Perhaps easier said than done But there are so many eternal stories here Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, Sinbad the Sailor, Aladdin and the Magic Lamp that they must be read at least once to get the non Disney died versions like the Anderson and Grimm fairy tales that were similarly contorted to fit mass consumption and commercialisation by WaltCo 996 The Thousand and One Nights, AnonymousThe work was collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Greek, Indian, Jewish, Persian and Turkish folklore and literature In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Abbasid era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian w 996 The Thousand and One Nights, AnonymousThe work was collected over many centuries by various authors, translators, and scholars across West, Central, and South Asia and North Africa The tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Greek, Indian, Jewish, Persian and Turkish folklore and literature In particular, many tales were originally folk stories from the Abbasid era, while others, especially the frame story, are most probably drawn from the Pahlavi Persian work Hez r Afs n A Thousand Tales , which in turn relied partly on Indian elements 1981 346 385 For those 2 people who don t know, The Arabian Nights is sort of a collection of short stories told in the Arabian world, as I m told it should be called, which seems to include India and parts of China waaaaaay back in the day The framework of the story is about a sultan who caught his wife cheating on him After he has her killed, he decides to take out his revenge on the entire sex, so he marries a different wife every day and has her killed the next morning Scheherazade is the Grand Vizi For those 2 people who don t know, The Arabian Nights is sort of a collection of short stories told in the Arabian world, as I m told it should be called, which seems to include India and parts of China waaaaaay back in the day The framework of the story is about a sultan who caught his wife cheating on him After he has her killed, he decides to take out his revenge on the entire sex, so he marries a different wife every day and has her killed the next morning Scheherazade is the Grand Vizier s beautiful, intelligent daughter She realizes that this can t go on, so she comes up with a plan She asks to be the next wife of the sultan, and she starts telling him a story on their wedding night But buried within that story is another story The sultan is so intrigued by the story that he decides to let her live so he can find out how the story ends She keeps stringing him along like this, theoretically for 1000 nights, until he relents and gives her a full pardon and takes her for his real wife But that s only a very small part of the book The biggest part of the book is the stories Scheherazade tells the sultan Included are Aladdin, Ali Baba, Sinbad, and others that we ve probably all heard in one form or another.I just picked this up because I wanted to see what it was all about This version was very readable It was interesting to see a slice of Arabian life I would catch myself thinking, They treat women so badly over there and then I would remember that when these stories were first told, women were treated badly pretty much everywhere But then there would be some stories where the women had surprising freedom and I would catch myself wondering where things started going bad I can t say that I know enough about the culture to comment on what s changed and what hasn t, but these stories do give you a little idea of what life is was like in the Middle East and where they re coming from And in these times, a little understanding can only be a good thing As I say in my review, I wanted to write a parody of this wonderful book but was forced to admit defeat Burton is too damn clever for a good parody to be possible During my preliminary negotiations, I had however received a remarkable offer from Alfonso A Burton parody without political incorrectness is unthinkable, and Alfonso bravely put himself forward to play the role of an evil blackamoor of hideous appearance It seems wrong that Alfonso s selfless devotion to literature should go unrew As I say in my review, I wanted to write a parody of this wonderful book but was forced to admit defeat Burton is too damn clever for a good parody to be possible During my preliminary negotiations, I had however received a remarkable offer from Alfonso A Burton parody without political incorrectness is unthinkable, and Alfonso bravely put himself forward to play the role of an evil blackamoor of hideous appearance It seems wrong that Alfonso s selfless devotion to literature should go unrewarded I am therefore proud to present A Fragment of the Tale of Rashid al Bhattan and al Fonso the MaghrabiNow there dwelt not far from the Caliph s court another foreigner, a Darwaysh from the Maghrib named al Fonso, a powerful magician and geomancer from his earliest age upwards he had been addicted to witchcraft and had studied and practiced every manner of occult science, for which unholy lore the city of Africa is notorious And the Maghrabi possessed a seal ring, a signet that once had graced the hand of Solomon Davids son yet so woven about with secret spells and enchantments was it, that the Maghrabi could not avail himself of its familiar, for all his arts But by his gramarye, the Maghrabi learned how it stood with Rashid, and he thought himself a scheme whereby he might bend the ring to his will And one day, as Rashid left the Caliph s court, the Maghribi thrust himself in Rashid s way and addressing him, he asked if he would learn the infallible method to win the favour of any woman, even the highest and most beautiful.The Maghrabi was a hideous blackamoor, ill favoured and foul with grease and grime, and Rashid laughed to hear his words, believing that he spoke in jest But the Maghrabi spoke kindly to Rashid and flattered him and used all his charms to put him at his ease and presently he took forth the ring and instructed him in its use, telling him that he had but to rub it to gain aught that he might want, but that only one of the Isles of the Setting Sun might thus constrain the Spirit of the Ring and Rashid still doubting, the Maghrabi put the ring on Rashid s finger and told him to rub it Rashid did as the Maghrabi bade and instantly before him appeared a Marid He trembled at the terrible sight but, hearing the Slave of the Ring say, Ask whatso thou wantest, verily, I am thy thrall, seeing that the signet of my lord be upon thy finger , he took courage Command the Marid, said the Maghrabi, that he transport us to the Caliph s Harim Rashid did as the Maghrabi said Hearing and obeying, replied the Marid, and smote the earth, so that it clave in two and taking the Maghrabi under one arm and Rashid under the other, he bore them to the innermost sanctum of the Harim Hide thyself in this closet, said the Maghrabi to Rashid, when they were arrived As soon as thou dost espy one of the Caliph s concubines, command the Marid to make me in all ways pleasing to her then shalt thou see the true power of the Ring Rashid did as the Maghrabi said and no sooner had he concealed himself, than entered a girl high bosomed and pleasing of face, slender waisted and heavy of hip, of whom one might soothly say as the poet Eyes like two stars and hair as black as nightLips ruby red caught in a winsome puckerSo fair a maid I ween ne er crossed my sightTo look on her is aye to wish to embrace her.She glanced with displeasure on the Maghrabi but Rashid, heeding the magician s rede, rubbed the ring and commanded the Marid The Maghrabi spake some words to the girl and instantly her aspect changed, and she did with goodly gree suffer the Maghrabi, for all his hideousness, to kiss her and toy with her, and presently to disrobe her of her gold purfled dress and even of her petticoat trousers and know her carnally , whereby she joyed with great joyance Now command the Marid to take us hence, said the Maghrabi without even making the Ghusl ablution, for he was a Kafir and again Rashid commanded the Marid, and they made good their escape, leaving the Caliph s concubine swooned on the ground Notes I use Lane s somewhat anaemic translation The Breslau Edition adds some details concerning the excessive size of the Maghrabi s manhood the wording leaves it unclear whether or not this can be ascribed to the influence of the Ring A review is pointless for this book It s a classic and everyone should read it Those who are complaining about how women are treated in the stories should read itcarefully and should pay attention also when it was first written Reading this edition, two things amazed me how well I remember all the stories, taking into consideration that last time I read them wasthan 20 years ago and second, how accurate the Romanian translation I read is compared to this one As for this edition, A review is pointless for this book It s a classic and everyone should read it Those who are complaining about how women are treated in the stories should read itcarefully and should pay attention also when it was first written Reading this edition, two things amazed me how well I remember all the stories, taking into consideration that last time I read them wasthan 20 years ago and second, how accurate the Romanian translation I read is compared to this one As for this edition, it is simply superb Starting with the translation, the beautiful artworks inside its pages, the cover, the paper It is a feast for eyes, senses and soul.Loved it I read 1001 Nights several times in my childhood and adolescence and loved them to pieces I still have it in Romanian translation, 4 volumes, edition from 1959 from my grandparents But I couldn t resist not to buy this exquisite edition it is absolutely gorgeous For many months, from now on, it will be on my nightstand to savor now and then a story from it, the beautiful artwork of the pages and the stunning illustrations.Have a look When I first read One Thousand and One Nights I was literally put under the book s spell charmed, enchanted and bewitched It isn t just magic of fairytales It is first of all magic of the oriental world And of course I was at once mesmerized with the incredible frame tale of Shahryar and Scheherazade.Nowhere is so much magic as in Arabian Nights magical word opening the cave door Open, Sesame And forthwith appeared a wide doorway in the face of the rock The robbers went in, and last When I first read One Thousand and One Nights I was literally put under the book s spell charmed, enchanted and bewitched It isn t just magic of fairytales It is first of all magic of the oriental world And of course I was at once mesmerized with the incredible frame tale of Shahryar and Scheherazade.Nowhere is so much magic as in Arabian Nights magical word opening the cave door Open, Sesame And forthwith appeared a wide doorway in the face of the rock The robbers went in, and last of all their chief, and then the portal shut of itself, powerful Jinni sealed in the magical lamp This is not he, O my mother This who appeared before thee is the Slave of the Lamp and many, many others.And of course my favourite tales are Voyages of Sindbad the Seaman Stunning adventures in the distant lands full of fantastic beasts, evil creatures, monsters, wonders and miracles And most of all I was stupefied and simultaneously disgusted with Old Man of the Sea I told them all that had betided me, whereat they marveled with exceeding marvel and said He who rode on thy shoulder is called the Sheikh al Bahr or Old Man of the Sea, and none ever felt his legs on neck and came off alive but thou, and those who die under him he eateth So praised be Allah for thy safety Even nowadays I gratefully remember this miraculous book, which practically was for me a door into the absolutely new world Oh, the wonders of literature While reading this book I could not help but sing the songs or hum the tunes associated with the tales A whole new worldA new fantastic point of viewNo one to tell us noOr where to goOr say we re only dreaming I grew up with mostly Filipino komiks around me Only my father loved reading books and we had very few compared to what I have now classics and contemporary books at home My parents did not read to me when I was young Those are the reasons why Oh, the wonders of literature While reading this book I could not help but sing the songs or hum the tunes associated with the tales A whole new worldA new fantastic point of viewNo one to tell us noOr where to goOr say we re only dreaming I grew up with mostly Filipino komiks around me Only my father loved reading books and we had very few compared to what I have now classics and contemporary books at home My parents did not read to me when I was young Those are the reasons why I missed all those children s books So, reading these Tales from 1001 Nights a.k.a., The Arabian Nights was like going back to the komiks time in the province You see, the story of Aladdin and the Magic Lamp, although I read it just now, is so popular that we must all have seen it in movies, read in local adaptations as individual children s books or comics or even seen in TV ads However, if you compare the original story to the Disney produced movie, the carpet in the book does not fly Rather, it just covers the distance between the entrance of the King s palace and Alladin s pavilion so that the princess, Lady Badar Al Budur maybe the equivalent of Princess Jasmine will not walk on mud The story is fantastic I admire how the magician thinks cunning and devious I hate Alladin before he got rich particularly on his laziness and how he treats his old mother A li ba ba A li ba ba I still remember the theme and my sister used to mimic it Low key She marches like a soldier and with eyes wide and scary The other tale that I liked was Ali Baba and The Forty Thieves Who would not remember ourselves shouting Open Se sa mewhen we saw a closed door when we were kids Then expecting our mom or playmate to open it for us Who says that this book treats women badly In this tale, the maid Morgiana is so smart that she saves his master s Ali Baba life several times Sinbad the SailorSailing through the seas I tried looking this up for lyrics but I think that there is a popular Hindi rock song with the same title I remember the tune and I thought that it is similar to Popeye the Sailor Man or maybe as catchy as that Well, the tale of Sinbad the Sailor is a short one and it talks about is mistake of killing his falcon It is one of those tales inside another tale.All of these 70 whew tales are framed into a story that Scheherazade is telling King Shahryar so that she will not be killed The king and his brother have philandering wives who they have killed so the King does not want to have a wife any so he orders his vizier assistant to bring young pretty girls from the village and after one night of sex, the king orders his soldiers to kill the girl To survive, the wise Scheherazade tells the 1001 tales, part by part The king, so eager to know what comes next, decides not to kill her until all the tales are told I will not tell you if she gets eventually killed in the end Ah, if only I could write like the late Sir Richard Burton Normally I dislike translations, but to refuse to read The Arabian Nights on those grounds would be like refusing to read the Bible I love parodying people s styles, and I have tried my utmost to parody Burton convincingly, but I can t do it He s too clever He has taken this unique book, a miraculous survival from the most ancient antiquity, and he has created a unique language to make it accessible to us the backbone is a kind of S Ah, if only I could write like the late Sir Richard Burton Normally I dislike translations, but to refuse to read The Arabian Nights on those grounds would be like refusing to read the Bible I love parodying people s styles, and I have tried my utmost to parody Burton convincingly, but I can t do it He s too clever He has taken this unique book, a miraculous survival from the most ancient antiquity, and he has created a unique language to make it accessible to us the backbone is a kind of Spenserian English, but he has modified it in subtle ways, adding some French roots here, some Nordic ones there, pinches ofobscure ingredients when he feels he needs them, creating alliterations and internal rhymes and odd sentence structures to echo the rhythms of the original, inserting endless footnotes to tell us poor people what we re missing through not knowing Arabic Burton is always present in the text, leading us by the hand through his favorite passages, flooring us with a jaw droppingly inappropriate comment one moment it isn t sexist or racist it transcends sexism and racism and then turning round a second later to hit us with a marvellous piece of poetry or romance or heroism, crowing over his rivals mistakes, inserting irrelevant anecdotes or obscure pieces of etymology that he just couldn t resist, showing off his knowledge of the seventeen languages he speaks fluently and the others that he just has a passing acquaintance with And all the time, often without us even realizing what he s doing, telling us about Islam, the religion so many of us Westerners fear without understanding it, showing us what it s like from the inside, from the perspective of an eighth century cobbler or Caliph or slave girl, how, whatever else it may be, it is a great religion, one that hundreds of millions of people have gladly lived and died in, without ever questioning the will of Allah or his prophet Mohammed, peace be upon him.I have never read anything like it Full Of Mischief, Valor, Ribaldry, And Romance, The Arabian Nights Has Enthralled Readers For Centuries These Are The Tales That Saved The Life Of Shahrazad, Whose Husband, The King, Executed Each Of His Wives After A Single Night Of Marriage Beginning An Enchanting Story Each Evening, Shahrazad Always Withheld The Ending A Thousand And One Nights Later, Her Life Was Spared Forever This Volume Reproduces The 1932 Modern Library Edition, For Which Bennett A Cerf Chose The Most Famous And Representative Stories From Sir Richard F Burton S Multivolume Translation, And Includes Burton S Extensive And Acclaimed Explanatory Notes These Tales, Including Alaeddin Or, The Wonderful Lamp, Sinbad The Seaman And Sinbad The Landsman, And Ali Baba And The Forty Thieves, Have Entered Into The Popular Imagination, Demonstrating That Shahrazad S Spell Remains Unbroken.


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