PDF / Epub ☉ Leo Africanus Author Amin Maalouf – Pmgtest.info

Leo Africanus 1488 14941494 1513 1513 15191519 1527 . , In many ways, Leo Africanus resembles the picaresque novels of the 17th and 18th century A charming everyman hero wanders the world and all the disordered societies in it, and we are pleased to follow his adventure He starts off as a young boy in Andalusia, and his family flees at the end of the Reconquista in 1492 After that, he moves along with the sweep of human history and God s unknowable designs He travels from Fez to Ouarzazate and Timbuktu, to Cairo and Mecca and Rome He becomes ric In many ways, Leo Africanus resembles the picaresque novels of the 17th and 18th century A charming everyman hero wanders the world and all the disordered societies in it, and we are pleased to follow his adventure He starts off as a young boy in Andalusia, and his family flees at the end of the Reconquista in 1492 After that, he moves along with the sweep of human history and God s unknowable designs He travels from Fez to Ouarzazate and Timbuktu, to Cairo and Mecca and Rome He becomes rich, survives wars, is taken a slave by pirates, and then adopted by the Pope and given a baptismal name The book can be enjoyed at face value as an adventure story Maalouf has clearly done his historical research, and happily goes into long excursions about the last stand of the Mameluke King of Egypt, Gian Bernini, and the lovely city of Fez There are manylayers to this story if you look 341 342 ,1488 1527 1488 1527 , ,, Leo Africanus belongs to several very old traditions of storytelling It is epic, heroic, and, joins a long line of contemporary political commentaries hidden beneath a thin veil of time and space It is a tale based on the life of what we re almost sure is a real historical figure Leo Africanus or al Hassan ibn Muhammad al Wazan as his original name likely was, was a Muslim born in Granada about the time of the Reconquista His story begins with the voices of others, speaking to him, tellin Leo Africanus belongs to several very old traditions of storytelling It is epic, heroic, and, joins a long line of contemporary political commentaries hidden beneath a thin veil of time and space It is a tale based on the life of what we re almost sure is a real historical figure Leo Africanus or al Hassan ibn Muhammad al Wazan as his original name likely was, was a Muslim born in Granada about the time of the Reconquista His story begins with the voices of others, speaking to him, telling him who he is we follow his family into the large exile community of Granadans in Fez, Morroco, and then, slowly, follow Hasan himself as his story graduaally starts to become his own We re given a rich, wonderfully filled out picture of the Mediterranean and North Africa at the turn of the 16th century from Al Andalus to the Maghrib, from Timbuktu to the Sahara, downtown Cairo to wild independent mountain territories of Africa, Barbary pirate controlled port towns to Ottoman Constantinople, to Italy in the prime of the Renaissance This is the great strength of the book The reader is given a muchrounded picture of this era than is often typical in the West one that does not care what the hell Christopher thinks he can find in the West Indies, or the martial squabbles of Henry of England Maalouf is excellent at showing us a world balanced and mixed between East and West, where it was a very real possibility that a Sultan might rule in Rome, or the Castilians might decide to create an empire in North Africa Each little place visited has it s own proud history that matters very much and who are you over there to think that yours mattersHe does a wonderful job at showing us how absolutely meaningless any kind of border we create is, whether physical or mental What s great about Leo Hasan whoever he is at the moment is that he seems both the essence of his time, in the thick of each development, and yet an escapee from history, able to look like many different people, have many different names as with all exiles lit, this book is all about the names while remaining himself despite it all Maalouf s addition to the beatitudes isBlessed are the outsiders,a blessing that his main character is both tortured and exonerated by It is hard not to be moved by Maalouf s movingly expressed ultimate mission of tolerance and peace especially when we know that the 40 years of bloody, pointless, absurd conflict that Leo Africanus witnesses is a stand in for an ongoing contemporary conflict that has lastedthan 40 years now and shows no signs of stopping Despite being published in 1986, this book remains, sadly, as relevant today as the day it was published.However And it s a very unfortunate however I do have to detract some points for the technical construction of this novel It is an epic, as I said, and since it is trying to give us a history of 40 years of this area of the world, our main character is required to be in a lot of places and meet a lot of people We re never in one place for very long, which for one thing makes the story rather disjointed and underdeveloped, and for another a real person would need a miracle to make it happen And so he gets miracles Lots of them His progress is frankly ridiculously unbelievable It requires every other person he meets to take a special liking to him, and give him amazing gifts, money, opportunities that allow him to progress to the next unbelievable meeting he sees everyone from Raphael of Urbino and Pope Leo to the Ottoman Sultan, the pirate Barbarossa, and kings from lands near and far Unfortunately, our character is not at all developed one assumes due to time constraints in getting him all over Africa and Europe so we have no idea why he s so special, and nor are we given much of a reason to care We are supposed to like him, as he voices a number of modern approved political opinions, but the dispersal of these feels cheap And also, I just have to note, his character does a number of despicable things that are hard to forgive such as repeatedly abandoning his wives and children, and even, on one occasion, having sex with his wife on their wedding night despite the fact that she faints away that the prospect she s quite sheltered and religious When he s taken to task for this by one of his wives, we get some answer about how you just can t tie me down, baby , that s supposed to tie into his exile, rootless nature, but really just reads as a cheap excuse for him to get on with the next scene of his life, since Maalouf has said all he wants to say involving the particular storyline that woman is a part of There are one or two developed characters Hasan Leo s best friend Hurun, for example, one of his wives, and at one point his father who serves asof a representative sample, but it still works , but these are picked up and put down as our Hero needs them to continue on I love exile lit, don t get me wrong, but it is at it s most powerful where we believe that the main character is exiled from something this particular character doesn t seem to have much of a stake in anything he s able to abandon each thing as necessary and we rarely see him carry over any wounds from one book of his story to another It doesn t help that the story is told in a very impersonal tone, a tone that struck me as fairly unbelievable most of the time after all, the story is meant to be him writing down his life for his young son and only in the and here s the message, kids, interludes between the volumes of his story do we see any of that like the author himself sometimes forgets his format I didn t feel at all emotionally attached to this book, and I really wanted to It s just such a shame.This book should ve either been much longer, or found a way to give us it s messages without the Where s Waldo round Maalouf he had to write before he could make the kind of universal statements he wanted to make here In the end, I felt like I was being called to witness something when what I really wanted and what he gave us in those all too brief glimpses was to get to know someone who had witnessed, and survived Check this out Wherever you are , some will want to ask questions about your skin or your prayers Beware of gratifying their instincts, my son, beware of bending before the multitude Muslim, Jew or Christian, they must take you as you are, or lose you When men s minds seem narrow to you, tell yourself that the land of God is broad broad His hands and broad His heart Never hesitate to go far away, beyond all seas, all frontiers, all countries, all beliefs p.360 Now go and read it Leo Africanus Is A Beautiful Book Of Tales About People Who Are Forced To Accept Choices Made For Them By Someone ElseIt Relates, Petically At Times And Often Imaginatively, The Story Of Those Who Did Not Make It To The New World New York Times Book Review


About the Author: Amin Maalouf

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Leo Africanus book, this is one of the most wanted Amin Maalouf author readers around the world.


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